How to get started: After analyzing data from thousands of online courses, we created a launch strategy you can use to launch your own business—you can click here learn about Teachable’s Crazy 8 Launch Strategy. Example For an example of a successful launch, you can check out one of my favorite posts on the Teachable blog. In this amazing case study, Nat Eliason explains exactly how he launched his first online course and made $48,150 in the process.   
Hello Mark, I absolutely loved this article. It’s very thorough. I wanted to ask in Step 3 that is “Defining the Criteria for Each Stage” in each sub-step if the customer is not responding to sales call we are sending them back to the previous sub-step. In between each sub-step, can we put one more stage where we are approaching the customer one more time through Email or SMS where in we give them a last chance to move forward and if they don’t reply to it, then we put them back in the previous sub-step?
You need to understand your audience like you do your very own yourself. You are aware of your dislikes and likes, you know what problems you face and you know the sort of people you will let help with those problems. If you learn to know your audience in the same manner, the chances of you establishing a genuine connection increase vastly. You will also be able to guide more people through your sales funnel and get those coveted ‘closed-wons’.
Example: Angela Fehr, who teaches watercolor classes on her Teachable school, offers a wide variety of courses like landscaping, fluid painting, and creative painting. Angela created a comprehensive bundle of her individual courses. It’s called called “Watercolor University” and it includes a total of twelve courses, which she sells for a premium price.

How to get started: The easiest way to start a community is to leverage tools that are already built for this purpose. Our preferred one for its simplicity is a closed Facebook Group. When you’re just starting your group, it’s important for you to define some basic guidelines for participation and interactions within your group, this will tell you what’s acceptable and what isn’t within your group. You can join Teachable’s Facebook group, The Teachable Tribe, to check out how we did this.
Following their information search — or sometimes running concurrently with this process — potential customers start comparing the alternatives that your article has discussed. Again, the time spent in this stage will vary based on the type of purchase being contemplated. Choosing a restaurant might be as simple as deciding, “Well, I feel like Chinese food, not Mexican, tonight.”
It’s important to note that there is not a single agreed upon version of the funnel; some have many “stages” while others have few, with different names and actions taken by the business and consumer for each. In the diagram below, we’ve done our best to pull out the most common and relevant funnel stages, terms, and actions so this information is useful to as many marketers as possible.
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