One of the core concepts in the digital marketing industry is the sales funnel. While odd sounding at first, this single core concept can take a business from virtually non-existent and unknown to multi-million-dollar marketing machine with mass saturation, seemingly overnight. In fact, there are skilled practitioners who have built a career around implementing this single concept in business.  
Entry sources – Monitoring the sources from which people are entering your funnel can be useful data to track, as it gives you ideas for expanding the reach of your marketing campaigns. If, for example, you see that a large number of your prospects are coming from a single guest blog post you did, you can upgrade and expand on it, add a free consultation opportunity on that blog post, and/or find similar guest author positions.
Remarketing: We already covered remarketing in the middle of the funnel section of the post. In this stage of the funnel, you can use remarketing to target those leads who are really close to purchasing your product. For example, you could target people who visited your sales page but didn’t purchase the product, or maybe target those who downloaded one of your lead magnets to offer them a special discount.    
A customer is made aware of the product through marketing and advertising campaigns, consumer research and discovery. The awareness is followed by gathering information in some form from him. This process of gathering information is called lead generation and the information is further used in the lead management system to nurture it down the system.
Webinars: Webinars are really powerful marketing tools. Like mini courses, webinars allow you to showcase your knowledge on a topic to your audience, with the difference that this is done as a live event—which allows your leads to have direct contact with you. As you might expect, webinars are considerably more time consuming than other tactics, but you can expect higher engagement and conversion rates from those who attend your live session.   

Visitor-to-lead conversion rate: This metric will tell you what percentage of your website visitors end up becoming leads. You can use this as an indicator of how attractive your offer to become a lead (we’ll talk about the type of content you should use in this stage in a second) is to your visitors. As you might expect, you should aim for a high conversion rate. If you use tools to capture leads with popups forms, this metric will be tracked and provided to you. However, if you use other tactics to collect leads you might need to use Google Analytics goals to keep track of this metric.  
Advocacy: Turning your customers into advocates is the ultimate evolution for nurturing current customers. Evangelism in the form of writing product reviews, posting about products on social media, and more can help drive more new leads for your marketing funnel. Having an external recommendation not connected to a brand can strongly influence prospects. Marketers can work to develop their communities to better support advocates, ask them to participate in case studies, or engage them around consumer-generated content on social media.

However, say the customer is evaluating marketing automation programs to help improve the sales funnel they created. Because these programs can require investments of $1,500 a month, they’re likely to undergo a much more careful and thorough evaluation process. They might request free trials of the different systems they’re considering, have online demonstrations with each company’s representatives or view training videos to get a feel for how each system will perform.


In this scenario, you’re asking people to take little steps, instead of going right from “mailing list sign up” to “spend $1000”. Downloading a free ebook isn’t a big step. Once you’ve done that, sure, why not share? Hey, if the info was valuable in the free book, the info in a $19 book is probably great! Oh, there’s a $197 program? Yes, I would love to join, because I already got more than that much value from your lower-cost items. Spend $1000? Sure!
Below, I’ll introduce you to the modern online marketing funnel model—the framework that should drive your entire digital marketing strategy. I’ve broken down each stage of the new buyer’s journey and provided marketing strategies and tactics that work best at each phase. You’ll also find real-world examples and expert advice on the “how” of making this work for your business. The goal is for you to walk away with a clear understanding of how the (modern) online buyer’s journey works and how best to market to your target audience at each stage. 
A customer is made aware of the product through marketing and advertising campaigns, consumer research and discovery. The awareness is followed by gathering information in some form from him. This process of gathering information is called lead generation and the information is further used in the lead management system to nurture it down the system.
Several debates have been revolving around the applicability of marketing funnels today, where the fashion of purchasing is no longer linear. Prospective customers might not enter the marketing funnel in the first stage itself – they might join in on different levels of the funnel. This would hold true if they are suggested to buy a particular product from a particular brand and a particular site and hence might step into the funnel towards its ultimate stages. They might also conduct researches elsewhere and derive their conclusions on their own, without any help from the B2C’s intervention. Hence several alternatives to the marketing funnel are coming up, such as McKinsey’s circular model.

If you’re a small business owner, you might be a one-man (or one-woman) show, wearing several hats, including both sales and marketing. As your business grows, though, you’ll need to hire people for your team. One of the biggest mistakes I see companies make over and over again is having their sales team and marketing team work completely independently of one another.
Yesterday I was in the Northridge Mall while my tires were being rotated at Firestone outside. When I walked in there a man was promoting Occulus, the 3D experience. . . for $5 a journey. I didn’t have any bucks so I declined. I was wondering why he didn’t use the email model of a free gift to get a subscriber; I mean a free trip using the mind altering adventure. Then I got to thinking about video and 3D in email, and it dawned on me the cycle of a company’s promotion is a like a trip into virtual reality–at least it could be a mind-altering experience for the recipient, especially for someone who’s tired of getting ads, ads, ads.
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